Concentration, unionization, and the distribution of income in Canadian manufacturing industry
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Concentration, unionization, and the distribution of income in Canadian manufacturing industry by Abraham Hollander

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Published by Université de Montréal, Département de science économique et Centre de recherche en développement économique in Montreal .
Written in English

Subjects:

Places:

  • Canada

Subjects:

  • Manufacturing industries -- Canada -- Mathematical models.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Statementby Abraham Hollander.
SeriesCahier / Département de science économique et Centre de recherche en développement économique, Université de Montréal,, 8111, Cahier (Université de Montréal. Département de sciences économiques) ;, 8111.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHD9734.C25 H64 1981
The Physical Object
Pagination21 p. ;
Number of Pages21
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL3879594M
LC Control Number81205205

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Income inequality in the United States is the extent to which income is distributed in an uneven manner among the American population. It has fluctuated considerably since measurements began around , moving in an arc between peaks in the s and s, with a year period of relatively lower inequality between – In , the ratio between the income of the top and bottom 20 percent of the world's population was three to one. By , it was eighty-six to one. A study titled "Divided we Stand: Why Inequality Keeps Rising" by the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) sought to explain the causes for this rising inequality by investigating economic inequality in OECD. Unionization and plant closure in Canada Article in Canadian Journal of Economics/Revue Canadienne d`Economique 39(4) November with 52 Reads How we measure 'reads'. Within the private sector, the density de- clined from percent in to percent in (Morisette, Schellenberg, and Johnson , In certain industries - notably resource extraction.

Income inequality in the United States is the extent to which income is distributed in an uneven manner among the American population. [1] It has fluctuated considerably since measurements began around , moving in an arc between peaks in the s and s, with a year period of relatively lower inequality between – Economic inequality, also known as income inequality, wealth inequality, gap between rich and poor, gulf between rich and poor and contrast between rich and poor, refers to how economic metrics are distributed among individuals in a group, among groups in a population, or among ists generally think of three metrics of economic disparity: wealth (wealth inequality), income. Economic inequality is the difference found in various measures of economic well-being among individuals in a group, among groups in a population, or among ic inequality is sometimes called income inequality, wealth inequality, or the wealth ists generally focus on economic disparity in three metrics: wealth, income, and consumption. Canada has also been experiencing declining rates of unionization though the statistics reflect a different pattern. First, the US unionization rate in stands at approximately 12% (down from % in ) compared to 30% in Canada (down from 38% in the late s) (Block et al., ; US Department of Labor, ). Block et al. posit that.

Income inequality metrics or income distribution metrics are used by social scientists to measure the distribution of income and economic inequality among the participants in a particular economy, such as that of a specific country or of the world in general. While different theories may try to explain how income inequality comes about, income. Income inequality has risen in every state since the s and, in most states, it has grown in the post–Great Recession era. From to , the incomes of the top 1 percent grew faster than the incomes of the bottom 99 percent in 43 states and the District of Columbia. The top 1 percent captured half or more of all income growth in nine states. In , a family in the top 1 percent. We illustrate the practical aspects of the procedure by analyzing how the polarization of U.S. male wages between the late s and the mid s was affected by factors such as de-unionization, education, occupations, and industry changes. Full article.   "The Effect of Unionization on Employment Growth of Canadian Companies," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 46, No. 4 (July ), .